Dialysis catheter insertion

Dialysis catheter insertion

Dialysis catheter insertion

Dialysis catheter insertion, specifically the permcath or permanent catheter, is a procedure used to establish vascular access for hemodialysis in patients with kidney failure or severe kidney dysfunction.

During the procedure, the patient is typically positioned lying down. The area where the catheter will be inserted, usually the neck or groin, is cleaned and sterilized. Local anesthesia is administered to numb the area.

For a permcath insertion, a small incision is made in the skin, and the catheter is inserted into a large vein, such as the jugular vein in the neck or the femoral vein in the groin. The catheter has two separate tubes or lumens, one for blood withdrawal and the other for blood return. The catheter is advanced into the vein until the tip is ideally positioned within the central veins near the heart.

Once the catheter is in place, it is secured to the skin using sutures or a specialized anchoring device. The exit site on the skin is typically covered with a sterile dressing to reduce the risk of infection.

The permcath allows for repeated access to the bloodstream for hemodialysis sessions. It is a temporary option while other forms of vascular access, such as arteriovenous fistulas or grafts, are being prepared or if they are not suitable for the patient.

Overall, the permcath insertion procedure involves the placement of a catheter into a large vein, typically in the neck or groin, to provide temporary vascular access for hemodialysis treatment. It allows for the removal and return of blood during dialysis sessions.