Chemoembolization of Liver Tumours

Chemoembolization of Liver Tumours

Chemoembolization

Chemoembolization is a minimally invasive procedure that is used to treat liver tumors. It is a combination of chemotherapy and embolization. Chemotherapy is the use of drugs to kill cancer cells. Embolization is the blocking of blood flow to a tumor.

In chemoembolization, a catheter is inserted into an artery in the groin and threaded through the blood vessels to the liver. The catheter is then used to deliver chemotherapy drugs and small particles to the tumor. The particles block the blood flow to the tumor, which starves the tumor of oxygen and nutrients.

Chemoembolization is used to treat a variety of liver tumors, including:

  • Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)
  • Metastatic liver tumors

Chemoembolization is a safe and effective procedure. It can help to shrink tumors and improve the quality of life for patients with liver cancer.

The risks of chemoembolization include:

  • Bleeding
  • Infection
  • Liver damage
  • Pain

In most cases, the benefits of chemoembolization outweigh the risks. The procedure is a safe and effective way to treat liver tumors.

Here are the steps involved in chemoembolization:

  1. The patient is given sedation or general anesthesia.
  2. A catheter is inserted into an artery in the groin.
  3. The catheter is threaded through the blood vessels to the liver.
  4. Chemotherapy drugs and small particles are delivered to the tumor.
  5. The catheter is removed.

The patient will usually be able to go home the same day after chemoembolization. The procedure is usually successful in shrinking tumors, but there is a small risk of recurrence.